sourdough gula melaka mantou

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soudough gula melaka mantouThis mantou is different from the others I’ve made, as this is using sourdough discard in the pre-ferment dough.

As with all sourdough recipes, this has changed the texture of the mantou. It is not as light and fluffy, though still reasonably soft. But the fragrance is much more pronounced. I like this!

Sourdough gula melaka mantou

Pre-ferment

  • 241 grams 100% sourdough starter (I used discard not more than 3 days old)
  • 120 grams all-purpose flour
  • 120 grams Prima superlite flour
  • 30 grams castor sugar
  • 50 ml water

Main dough

  • 200 grams all-purpose flour
  • 100 grams Prima superlite flour
  • 90 grams good quality gula melaka
  • 200-210 ml milk
  • 5 grams instant yeast
  • 70 grams pre-ferment
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 tbsp oil
  1. Mix all the pre-ferment ingredients together in a bowl. Knead to form a dough. Cover and ferment at room temperature for an hour. Place in fridge to ferment for another 18-24 hours.
  2. Divide preferment into 70 grams portion. Keep the unused pre-ferment in the freezer in ziploc bags.
  3. In a saucepan, melt gula melaka in the milk. Let it cool before using.
  4. Add all main dough ingredients, except oil and milk, into the bowl of a mixer. Add 180 milk first. If liquid is not enough, gradually add in more, 1 tablespoon at a time. I used about 210 ml. Mix for 3-4 minutes until a dough is formed.
  5. Add in oil. Knead until windowpane stage.
  6. Prepare a steamer with enough water to boil for half an hour.
  7. Shape and divide dough. Place on small squares of parchment paper and into the steamer. Proof in the steamer, covered, for an hour.
  8. After an hour, turn on fire to medium heat. After you can see steam billowing out, steam for another 10 minutes.
  9. Turn off heat and open the cover slightly. Leave for 5 minutes before taking mantou out to serve.

Sourdough gula melaka mantou1

Assorted macarons

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Red yeast & chocolate macaronI’ve got a container of egg whites sitting in the fridge for 3 weeks. So it’s macaron time…

After such a long break from making these delicious, delicate and temperamental cookies, I expected to fail spectacularly. Thank God most came out okay. The odd thing about making macarons is, within the same baking sheet, some may turn out nice while others crack and peak.

This round, I filled them with egg custard filling from Jill Colonna’s Mad About Macarons book. The filling is not sweet, when eaten by itself. Paired with the macaron shells, the taste is just right.

Red yeast macarons (adapted from Jill Colonna)

  • 50 grams aged egg whites
  • 25 grams castor sugar
  • 55 grams ground almond
  • 80 grams icing sugar
  • 3 grams red yeast powder
  1. Add almond, icing sugar and red yeast powder into the food processor. Blitz for a minute or two. Sift into a large bowl and set aside.
  2. Whisk egg whites with castor sugar until stiff peaks.
  3. Fold dry ingredients into meringue in 3 additions.
  4. Pipe macarons onto parchment lined baking sheets or silpats and let them dry for an hour. Alternatively, you can dry them with an oven. Either preheat oven to 160 C, turn off, open door and carefully perch piped macarons tray on the oven door for 15 minutes, rotating the tray halfway through, or preheat oven to 50 C and dry the macarons in the oven for 15 minutes.
  5. Preheat oven to 220 C on baking mode.
  6. Place macarons into oven, immediately turn down temperature to 130-140 C and change mode to fan forced. Bake for 20 minutes.
  7. Let cool before removing from baking sheets/silpats.

Chocolate/Dual color macarons (adapted from Jill Colonna)

  • 50 grams aged egg whites
  • 25 grams castor sugar
  • 50 grams ground almond
  • 80 grams icing sugar
  • 10 grams cocoa powder
  1. Add almond, icing sugar and cocoa powder into the food processor. Blitz for a minute or two. Sift into a large bowl and set aside.
  2. Whisk egg whites with castor sugar until stiff peaks.
  3. Fold dry ingredients into meringue in 3 additions.
  4. Pipe macarons onto parchment lined baking sheets or silpats and let them dry for an hour in an air-conditioned room. Alternatively, you can dry them with an oven. Either preheat oven to 160 C, turn off, open door and carefully perch piped macarons tray on the oven door for 15 minutes, rotating the tray halfway through, or preheat oven to 50 C and dry the macarons in the oven for 15 minutes.
  5. Preheat oven to 220 C on normal baking mode.
  6. Place macarons into oven, immediately turn down temperature to 130-140 C and change mode to fan forced. Bake for 20 minutes.
  7. Let cool before removing from baking sheets/silpats.
  8. To make dual color macarons, I made a portion of uncolored batter using the same ingredients as red yeast macarons, excluding the red yeast powder. Pipe half of macaron with plain and the other half with chocolate. It is not easy to get a nice round shape unless you’re using indented macaron sheets.

Filling

Egg custard

  • 1 egg
  • 20 grams custard powder
  • 20 grams castor sugar
  • 180 ml milk
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • 100 grams unsalted butter, softened
  • pinch of salt
  1. Whisk egg, custard powder and sugar in a bowl. Set aside.
  2. Add milk, vanilla pod and salt into a saucepan. Bring to a boil.
  3. Remove vanilla pod and scrape out seeds. Put vanilla pod and seeds back into the milk and cover. Let it steep for 20 minutes.
  4. Remove vanilla pod and discard.
  5. Add milk into egg mixture. Stir well and pour back into saucepan.
  6. Over low heat, stir custard constantly until it thickens. Scrape into a bowl and cover with a cling wrap, making sure the wrap touches the surface of the custard to prevent a skin forming.
  7. Let it cool completely before whisking in softened butter.
  8. Chill in the fridge for 10 minutes before using, if too soft.

Red yeast & chocolate macaron1

I filled the red yeast macarons with egg custard only. For the others, besides egg custard, I drizzled on some salted caramel sauce. The taste, as usual, is divine. Everyone loves sweet and salty caramel.